What is the difference between an interventional radiologist and a vascular surgeon

What Is The Difference Between An Interventional Radiologist and a Vascular Surgeon?

There is a lot to be said about the confusion between the difference between an Interventional Radiologist (IR) and a Vascular Surgeon. First, we need to understand what each speciality does: Interventional Radiologists¬† are vascular specialists who do minimally invasive procedures instead of surgery or other treatment, using image-guided diagnosis and treatment of diseases in every organ system. The main focus behind interventional radiology is providing a solution using the most modern, least invasive technique available in order to minimise risk and improve the outcomes for every patient with shorter hospital stays and comprehensive follow up care. “Historically, Interventional Radiologists have been doing catheter-based interventional procedures literally since 1963, when the first angioplasties were done,” says Timothy Murphy, MD. We ... READ MORE
RADIATION SAFETY

SAFETY. PROTECTION.

How do you feel when you hear these words? Reassured? Calm? These are words which should drive our practice and our interaction with staff and colleagues. With new technology, we have amazing opportunities to offer patients cutting edge percutaneous treatment. Not only can we offer minimally invasive treatment, but we can also offer minimal radiation dose to staff and patients using simple techniques. Looking forward to an evening of discussion, sharing and learning READ MORE
Dr Albert Goh_sydneymedicalintervetions_

Our passion for arteries leads us to an exciting research trial

As our insatiable quest for knowledge and the passion to help people continues to grow, director of Sydney Medical Interventions, Dr Albert Goh is excited to be the principal investigator at the RNSH for the SHIELD Clinical Trial (Study in Humans to Investigate the Efficacy and Safety of Luminal SBCV Delivery in Peripheral Artery Disease). As a consequence of any vascular procedure, whether surgical or interventional, the extracellular matrix (ECM), which activates a flow of inflammatory responses, can lead to thrombosis and the formation of scar tissue inside the vessel (neointimal hyperplasia) resulting in re-stenosis/re-narrowing. The current methodology to prevent the formation of scar tissue is to administer antiproliferative drugs during vascular procedures, potentially hindering the healing of the injured ... READ MORE